Sun burn and bruises and sprains… owww….

As per my bad form with my wrist, I have pulled a muscle in my right forearm. Between the increased weight of my bow, although it’s not much, and shooting 100 arrows a day 5 times a week I now have a very puffy forearm. The sunburn is because I completely forgot to wear sunscreen on the very beautiful sunny day. And now  have tan lines. Awesome. On Saturday, at practice with RUAC, I hit myself with my string–twice. And then again on Sunday, I did the same thing.

First it looked like this.
First it looked like this.
Then it looked like this.

I have started participating the a precision program where I can earn pins from the Adult Achievement Program. Yesterday was the first day. I shot 204/360. Not bad for my first time shooting 30 meters. I still shoot left. And before any one says anything, I know why I keep shooting left. I have been focusing through the sight instead of letting my peripheral vision do the work. So, now that I’m aware of that I will be keeping it in mind.

It’s really great to have a weekly incentive to shoot outside of my own desire to. I can’t wait to get my first pin and I am determined to get others.

 

My First Steps

I started shooting a few years ago and I caught the bug. Archery is very calming and very emotionally fulfilling, especially when you make the shot. About a year and half ago, maybe two at this point honestly, a friend of mine came to me with a proposition:

BILLIE: So I found a place that gives archery lessons, do you want to take one?

ME: I will if you will.

And so we did. Simple as that. Well–maybe not as simple as that. We went to Banger’s Sports Shop located in Winslow, NJ, for our lessons. They have set up varying levels of classes which works out wonderfully because you can repeat any level and if I had been forced to stand, draw, aim, and hold the way that I do now when I took my first lesson–I may not have caught the bug. We started with a lecture about the parts of the bow, which, if I must be honest, I didn’t actually know. It dawned on me then that although I had been shooting for about five years by that time that I really didn’t know much outside of nocking my arrow and pulling the string back.