Eon ★★★★★

2986865.jpgThere are few books that I hold in high enough regard to give them a five star rating. The only other book I’ve ever done that for is Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. I had a lot of trepidation going into this book, but I came out of it feeling like a kid again; like I had been a part of that story and that I could do anything. But there’s so much more to Eon than just making me feel like a hopeful reader that can’t get to the bookstore fast enough for the sequel.

Spoilers below.

 

The Lie Tree – ★★★★☆

I’m always enamored by girls in stories that seem innocent and invisible but use that to their advantage to carve their own path — which is exactly what Faith Sunderly does in The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge. It’s impossible to put down this historical mystery, set just after the advent of Darwin’s On The Origin of Species, where young Faith takes the matter of her father’s murder into her own hands.

Faith Sunderly leads a double life. To most people, she is reliable, dull, trustworthy—a proper young lady who knows her place as inferior to men. Lie Tree.jpgBut inside, Faith is full of questions and curiosity, and she cannot resist mysteries: an unattended envelope, an unlocked door. She knows secrets no one suspects her of knowing. She knows that her family moved to the close-knit island of Vane because her famous scientist father was fleeing a reputation-destroying scandal. And she knows, when her father is discovered dead shortly thereafter, that he was murdered.

In pursuit of justice and revenge, Faith hunts through her father’s possessions and discovers a strange tree. The tree only bears fruit when she whispers a lie to it. The fruit of the tree, when eaten, delivers a hidden truth. The tree might hold the key to her father’s murder—or it may lure the murderer directly to Faith herself.

-Goodreads

Historical fiction has always been that tiny love of mine, the flame of a candle burning in the back of my mind while I busied myself with fantasy. It’s always forgotten while I adventure with dragons and goblins, but I’m reminded how brightly that candle burns when I read something like The Lie Tree.

When I opened Lie Tree up, I couldn’t close it until I was almost halfway through, and the only reason I did was because it was 3 in the morning and I had work in a few hours. Faith is an incredibly strong female character–and not in the ways most people expect when they hear those three words. She’s immensely flawed, selfish and brash, but she’s kind and brave and willfull too. She seeks the truth when everyone else is blind to it, and she puts herself in danger to get to the bottom of it.

Every detail comes full circle in every aspect; Hardinge is a talented writer who wastes no word.

My only gripe, if I really could call it that, is the huge cast of characters. Some are only mentioned in passing and others we physically see on the page, but they end up flowing into one another and often I find myself asking, “Wait, who is that?”

It’s not a good thing to have happen, especially in a murder mystery where everyone you meet is a potential suspect. You forget who wronged whom or when they were last seen, and it gets confusing.

But regardless of your favorite genre, whether it’s fantasy or historical fiction, you ought to pick up The Lie Tree as soon as you can.

Goodreads . Amazon . B&N . Indie . Author Page

The Lie Tree publishes on April 19th, 2016.

Our Fiction Friday

Normally, I would talk about my own fiction, but for this My Fiction Friday I’m going to talk about my work with K. Leigh, Magdalyn Ann, Jen Dulo, Kevin Carneglia, and Cymantha Adkins on Round Robin Writes. First let me say that writing in collaboration is both exhilarating and harrowing. It is so much fun to build a world and further someone else’s creation but as the creator — well — it is certainly a learning experience when stories don’t run the way you thought them up in your head.

The largest problem the Robins have had to face has been Life. Cymantha and Kevin are no longer in school, but Jen is finishing her second BA (she has one in Writing Arts and is finishing English), Katy and Maggie are in their last semesters, and I am pursuing my MA in Writing. We also all work and have other responsibilities which constantly get in the way. But we have learned to work around it all.

Eon ★★★★★

There are few books that I hold in high enough regard to give them a five star rating. The only othereoncover book I’ve ever done that for is Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. I had a lot of trepidation going into this book, but I came out of it feeling like a kid again; like I had been a part of that story and that I could do anything. But there’s so much more to Eon than just making me feel like a hopeful reader that can’t get to the bookstore fast enough for the sequel.

Spoilers below.

 

Daisies are Forever ✪✪✪✪✰

_240_360_Book.1200.coverLiz Tolsma’s Daisies are Forever is an intriguing piece of historical fiction set in the European Theater, a period of WWII when Stalin and his Soviets are invading Germany. The story follows Gisela Cramer, a German/American refugee, and Mitch Edwards, a British POW who escaped from a German stalag. Mitch is almost caught again because of his heinous German accent. Luckily for him, Gisela comes to his rescue, claiming he is her husband.

The couple’s lie is safe until they meet Kurt, a wounded German soldier, who has his eyes set on Gisela. Kurt and his friend Audra, present the most danger to Gisela and Mitch. More dangerous than the Tiefliegers and the Red Army.