Blood Heir

This hot debut, perfect for fans of Shadow and Bone and An Ember in the Ashes, is the first book in an epic new series about a princess hiding a dark secret and the con man she must trust to clear her name for her father’s murder.

In the Cyrilian Empire, Affinites are reviled. Their varied gifts to control the world around them are unnatural—dangerous. And Anastacya Mikhailov, the crown princess, has a terrifying secret. Her deadly Affinity to blood is her curse and the reason she has lived her life hidden behind palace walls.

When Ana’s father, the emperor, is murdered, her world is shattered. Framed as his killer, Ana must flee the palace to save her life. And to clear her name, she must find her father’s murderer on her own. But the Cyrilia beyond the palace walls is far different from the one she thought she knew. Corruption rules the land, and a greater conspiracy is at work—one that threatens the very balance of her world. And there is only one person corrupt enough to help Ana get to its core: Ramson Quicktongue.

A cunning crime lord of the Cyrilian underworld, Ramson has sinister plans—though he might have met his match in Ana. Because in this story, the princess might be the most dangerous player of all.

Blood Heir, Amelie Wen Zhao
November 19, 2019

We begin as Ana is trolling a prison looking for a specific prisoner to help her clear her name. Desperate to keep her Affinity (magic) hidden from the guards, Ana spends a lot of time telling us she’s trying to keep it under control.

There is, perhaps, too much backward information at the beginning of Blood Heir. Her father is dead but we didn’t see him die, she’s on the run because people think she did it, but we’re not sure why, she somehow knows this prisoner will help her, but we don’t know who he is.

I was certainly intrigued by the action of the opening chase scene but it wasn’t enough to keep me going with all my questions.

The other reason I put it down was the way the writing flipped. Some parts were very well written. They felt perfect for a YA audience. But other parts felt overly informative and talked down to the reader. Basically, I don’t need a description for a sword so much as I do for the magic system.

I ended up not finishing.

My Rating: DNF

Storm and Fury

Eighteen-year-old Trinity Marrow may be going blind, but she can see and communicate with ghosts and spirits. Her unique gift is part of a secret so dangerous that she’s been in hiding for years in an isolated compound fiercely guarded by Wardens—gargoyle shape-shifters who protect humankind from demons. If the demons discover the truth about Trinity, they’ll devour her, flesh and bone, to enhance their own powers.

When Wardens from another clan arrive with disturbing reports that something out there is killing both demons and Wardens, Trinity’s safe world implodes. Not the least because one of the outsiders is the most annoying and fascinating person she’s ever met. Zayne has secrets of his own that will upend her world yet again—but working together becomes imperative once demons breach the compound and Trinity’s secret comes to light. To save her family and maybe the world, she’ll have to put her trust in Zayne. But all bets are off as a supernatural war is unleashed…

Storm and Fury, Jennifer Armentrout
June 11, 2019

I wanted to try something new. I tend to shy away from stories where the summary is heavily focused on the romance. It tends to lead to books I don’t often enjoy.

But I was intrigued by the main character who was losing her sight and was a human among gargoyle protectors. It gave me some serious 90s TV vibes. So I tried it out.

And it wasn’t for me.

I couldn’t get into the writing style at all. It felt like there was so much in the story that wasn’t being told–so I did some research, and it turns out Storm and Fury is a spin-off from one of the author’s other series. It obviously expected you to have read the other series as a lot of details seemed to be missing for a first-time reader.

Then there was Trinity. I was super into a mostly-blind MC. But the only times we were ever really made aware of the fact that Trin was losing her eyesight were occasional comments like “my eyesight was shit”.

I’m sure there are plenty of people who would love this book. I was not one of them. In the end, it just made me think of the shitty teen romance fantasies I read as a teen–which isn’t a good thing.

RATING: 🌟🌟

Dragon Round ★★☆☆☆

27276218A swashbuckling adventure! Dragons! Ships! High fantasy! Sounds like the perfect recipe for a perfect book. Dragon Round by Stephen S. Power seemed like it’d be entering my Top Books of 2016 list. It even has a gorgeous cover to boot! Look at how pretty it is. Unfortunately, the cover and the summary hyped me up more than the actual story did.

A swashbuckling adventure with a dark side. When a ship captain is stranded on a deserted island by his mutinous crew, he finds a baby dragon that just might be the key to his salvation…and his revenge.

He only wanted justice. Instead he got revenge.

Jeryon has been the captain of the Comber for over a decade. He knows the rules. He likes the rules. But not everyone on his ship agrees. After a monstrous dragon attacks the galley, the surviving crewmembers decide to take the ship for themselves and give Jeryon and his self-righteous apothecary “the captain’s chance”: a small boat with no rudder, no sails, and nothing but the clothes on his back to survive on the open sea.

Fighting for their lives against the elements, Jeryon and his companion land on an island that isn’t as deserted as they originally thought. They find a baby dragon that, if trained, could be their way home. But as Jeryon and the dragon grow closer, the captain begins to realize that even if he makes it off the island, his old life won’t be waiting for him and in order get justice, he’ll have to take it for himself.

-Goodreads

Everyone knows me as the person who loves dragons in my stories. There’s very little you have to do to make me love a book about dragons. But Dragon Round was everything I could have hated about a book with dragons in it.

It started off pretty well–the present tense was a bit odd for a high fantasy, but it worked for the opening scene, which involved Captain Jeryon, our main character, trying to steer his ship away from a potential dragon attack. When that plan fails and things start hitting the fan, Jeryon gets booted off his ship by his crew and is told he has the “captain’s chance” of survival: a dingy and the clothes on his back and nothing else. If he survives to tell the tale, he gets off scot-free.

He’s also got the ship’s healer, whom he mostly refers to as Poth (short for Apothecary, I presume), and things aren’t going well for them. A storm, starvation, dehydration and that’s before they land on the island full of flesh-eating blue crabs.

I was excited for the idea of two people trying to train a dragon and seek revenge, but I only got 25% of the way through the book before I had to put it down, for good. The present tense wasn’t working for me and it just kept bringing me out of the story. The narration, which often jumped from POV to POV within the same paragraph at times, was too full of jargon and I had to stop every line to look up the definition of half the words. It dragged on and there were so many times when I just wanted something, anything, to happen.

It never did.

I hate to do it, but I have to slot Dragon Round as a DNF. But I give it at least two stars for the stellar opening, the awesome premise and the gorgeous cover. I’d print it and hang it on my wall if I could.

Akarnae ★★☆☆☆

I always thought I loved portal fantasy stories; after all, I did spend ten years writing one, but Akarnae proved that I did not love portal fantasies as much as I thought I did.

This is Where it Ends ☆☆☆☆☆

2452912310:00 a.m.
The principal of Opportunity, Alabama’s high school finishes her speech, welcoming the entire student body to a new semester and encouraging them to excel and achieve.

10:02 a.m.
The students get up to leave the auditorium for their next class.

10:03
The auditorium doors won’t open.

10:05
Someone starts shooting.
Told over the span of 54 harrowing minutes from four different perspectives, terror reigns as one student’s calculated revenge turns into the ultimate game of survival.

This is Where it Ends is an insult to all the victims of school shootings, a morbidly intriguing topic given the psychology behind the act which is incredibly complex and certainly not to be taken lightly.