Judge a Book by its Cover #4

Holidays are over folks! Time to talk about books I may or may not request!

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Judge a Book by Its Cover

I can’t believe all the books I’m looking at this week publish on the same day. 

Thunderhead by Neil Shusterman

Thunderhead-cover.png

Cover: 🌟🌟🌟
Release Date: 9 Jan, 2018
Description:

Rowan and Citra take opposite stances on the morality of the Scythedom, putting them at odds, in the chilling sequel to the Printz Honor Book Scythefrom New York Times bestseller Neal Shusterman, author of the Unwind dystology.

The Thunderhead cannot interfere in the affairs of the Scythedom. All it can do is observe—it does not like what it sees.

A year has passed since Rowan had gone off grid. Since then, he has become an urban legend, a vigilante snuffing out corrupt scythes in a trial by fire. His story is told in whispers across the continent.

As Scythe Anastasia, Citra gleans with compassion and openly challenges the ideals of the “new order.” But when her life is threatened and her methods questioned, it becomes clear that not everyone is open to the change.

Will the Thunderhead intervene?

Or will it simply watch as this perfect world begins to unravel?

Would I Request It?

I’m a fan of the minimalist cover, but oh my… what a terrible title. I think it sounds a lot younger than it means to.

I don’t think I would request this. It sounds very tropey and predictable.


Nice Try, Jane Sinner by Lianna Oelke

nicetryjanesinner-cover.pngCover: 🌟🌟
Release Date: 9 Jan, 2018
Description:

It’s Kind of a Funny Story meets Daria in the darkly hilarious tale of a teen’s attempt to remake her public image and restore inner peace through reality TV. The only thing 17-year-old Jane Sinner hates more than failure is pity. After a personal crisis and her subsequent expulsion from high school, she’s going nowhere fast. Jane’s well-meaning parents push her to attend a high school completion program at the nearby Elbow River Community College, and she agrees, on one condition: she gets to move out.

Jane tackles her housing problem by signing up for House of Orange, a student-run reality show that is basically Big Brother, but for Elbow River Students. Living away from home, the chance to win a car (used, but whatever), and a campus full of people who don’t know what she did in high school… what more could she want? Okay, maybe a family that understands why she’d rather turn to Freud than Jesus to make sense of her life, but she’ll settle for fifteen minutes in the proverbial spotlight.

As House of Orange grows from a low-budget web series to a local TV show with fans and shoddy T-shirts, Jane finally has the chance to let her cynical, competitive nature thrive. She’ll use her growing fan base, and whatever Intro to Psychology can teach her, to prove to the world—or at least viewers of substandard TV—that she has what it takes to win.

Would I Request It?

In my experience, anything that says it’s like Daria is, in fact, not like Daria. This is reference three pop culture pieces to say what it is. It doesn’t sound like it can stand on its own without the comparison.

The cover is both busy and plain. So much happens on the sides, but hey, at least the author’s name doesn’t look like it’s a part of the title.


A Quiet Kind of Thunder by Sara Barnard

aquietkindofthunder-cover.pngCover: 🌟
Release Date: 9 Jan, 2018
Description:

A girl who can’t speak and a boy who can’t hear go on a journey of self-discovery and find support with each other in this gripping, emotionally resonant novel from bestselling author Sara Barnard. Perfect for fans of Morgan Matson and Jandy Nelson.

Steffi doesn’t talk, but she has so much to say.
Rhys can’t hear, but he can listen.

Steffi has been a selective mute for most of her life. The condition’s name has always felt ironic to her, because she certainly does not “select” not to speak. In fact, she would give anything to be able to speak as easily and often as everyone around her can. She suffers from crippling anxiety, and uncontrollably, in most situations simply can’t open her mouth to get out the words.

Steffi’s been silent for so long that she feels completely invisible. But Rhys, the new boy at school, sees her. He’s deaf, and her knowledge of basic sign language means that she’s assigned to help him acclimate. To Rhys, it doesn’t matter that Steffi doesn’t talk. As they find ways to communicate, Steffi discovers that she does have a voice, and that she’s falling in love with the one person who makes her feel brave enough to use it. But as she starts to overcome a lifelong challenge, she’ll soon confront questions about the nature of her own identity and the very essence of what it is to know another person.

 

Would I Request It?

UGHHHHHHHHHHHHH. This pairing has been done so many times. A deaf person and a mute, can they talk? Yes. Yes they can. Would not request.

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